Can your voice tell people you are sick?

Can your voice tell people you are sick?

Imagine talking into an app that records your voice and being told what disease you may have.

Researchers are studying whether a person’s voice characteristics can be analysed by machines to diagnose disease.

Beyond Verbal is an Israeli company that analyses people’s voices for emotions‚ and its patented software can tell a person or a listener what mood they are in. The software looks for 90 different markers in the voice that can show loneliness‚ anger and even being in love.

Call centres use Beyond Verbal technology to hear when customers on the line are angry or may be in the right mood to be ready to be offered a product for sale.

But the company now has preliminary evidence that diseases may be detected in the voice‚ even while not audible to the human ear.

“It’s the very early stages of the idea. We are still checking it‚” said the director of Beyond Verbal Health Research‚ Dr Daniella Perry.

Beyond Verbal teamed up with the Mayo Clinic‚ a medical research and hospital group in the US‚ and analysed 88 English-speaking patients who had coronary artery disease and had angiograms‚ which showed their arteries were blocked.

It also analysed these patients’ voices‚ those of nine people undergoing other tests and of 21 people who were healthy. Beyond Verbal recently announced it had found a distinguishing factor in the voice‚ only identifiable by its software‚ which showed when a person was 19 times more likely to have heart disease.

“It’s a very early finding but very significant‚” said Bianca Meger‚ showcasing the research at the Med in Israel conference.

The same study is now being conducted in China to see if the results are replicable with Mandarin speakers. The aim is to help doctors better decide who needs an angiogram.

In future‚ an app may be able to detect something in a person’s voice and warn them to see a doctor‚ who may then schedule an angiogram to detect blocked arteries.

“Even a one-day early warning of a heart attack would be good‚” Meger said. However‚ the software would never replace the current diagnosis method for blocked arteries‚ which is an angiogram‚ when an X-ray image is taken of blood vessels.

Using the voice to detect risk or likelihood of disease raises privacy concerns that people’s health could be monitored or screened without their knowledge.

Employers could use the software during interviews to see if candidates are healthy or not. Perry acknowledges this is a reality.

“As technology develops‚ there are more and more privacy concerns‚” she says.

-Katharine Child’s trip to the technology conference Med in Israel was sponsored by the Israel Export Institute.

Beyond Verbal Wins Frost & Sullivan’s Visionary Innovation Leadership Award Using Vocal Biomarkers To Detect Health Conditions Using Tone Of Voice

TEL AVIV, Israel BUSINESS WIRE Beyond Verbal ( www.beyondverbal.com ), the world leader in voice-driven Emotions Analytics, has been recognized by Frost & Sullivan as the winner of the 2016 Global Voice Analytics for Disorder Diagnostics Visionary Innovation Leadership Award.

“Its approach of gauging patients’ health, wellness, and emotions simultaneously with an artificial intelligence-enabled technology is truly exceptional. It stands out as the first company among its peers to go beyond the mental health arena to tackle the diagnostic and monitoring challenges of physical health conditions.”

Beyond Verbal earned Frost & Sullivan’s 2016 Global Visionary award for its commitment to advancing long-standing screening, monitoring, and diagnostic problems with a unique, non-intrusive approach. Beyond Verbal has proven that vocal intonations can provide significant insights into the inner-workings of human beings, and the company recently found a significant connection between vocal biomarkers and Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) with the Mayo Clinic.

“It’s a true honor to be recognized by Frost & Sullivan, one of the global leaders in market research and analysis,” said Yuval Mor, CEO of Beyond Verbal. “Our desire is to improve healthcare by combining Emotions Analytics, AI and IoT with traditional health care methods. Creating advanced and cost effective healthcare capabilities accessible to the masses. Beyond Verbal has already embarked on a research journey to identify patterns for several diseases, which can be seen in our recent study on coronary artery disease. This honor presented to us by Frost & Sullivan is just a small testament to how impactful our research findings are to the healthcare community.”

“Frost & Sullivan recognizes Beyond Verbal’s efforts to serve the healthcare patient and provider community through its novel, voice-based analytics technology,” said Siddharth Shah, a Research Analyst with
Frost & Sullivan. “Its approach of gauging patients’ health, wellness, and emotions simultaneously with an artificial intelligence-enabled technology is truly exceptional. It stands out as the first company among its peers to go beyond the mental health arena to tackle the diagnostic and monitoring challenges of physical health conditions.”

Beyond Verbal’s technology enables the understanding of emotions, well-being, and health conditions through the human voice. Founded in 2012, the award-winning company’s Emotions Analytics technology has numerous applications – from improving call center effectiveness, to quantifying emotions for market research purpose, and all the way to tracking health conditions over time – and is grounded in more than two decades of research by Chief Science Officer, Dr. Yoram Levanon.

The company will be attending the Health IT Conference 2017 (HIMSS17) in Orlando from February 19-23, 2017.

About Beyond Verbal:
Since its launch in 2012, Beyond Verbal has been using voice-driven emotions AI to dramatically change the way we can detect emotions and reveal health conditions. The only input needed is the human voice, making this technology non-intrusive, passive, and cost effective. Beyond Verbal’s technology has been developed based on ongoing research into the science of emotions that started in 1995. By combining the company’s patented technology with its proprietary machine learning-based algorithms and AI, Beyond Verbal is focusing on emotions understanding and discovering vocal biomarkers. During the past 22 years, the company has been able to hone its technology through multiple internal tests and independent external validations. Over time, Beyond Verbal has collected more than 3 million emotion-tagged voices in more than 40 languages, and secured their technology with multiple granted patents.

14 Innovative Startups That Prove We are Living in the Sci-fi Future

I was one of those Back to the Future kids who has always dreamed about hoverboards and flying cars and everything else we were promised in movies from 20 to 30 years ago. When you think about it, 20 to30 years is actually a great timeframe for tech predictions. It’s far enough in the future that you can imagine tech developments that are interesting, but still close enough that there’s a chance you’ll get things right.

Predictions looking farther down the road than that, such as the ones you’ll find in Star Trek, are too distant from our own lives to be truly tempting. But 20 years from now most of us will still be around to enjoy that future technology, if it comes to pass.

Actually, Back to the Future II is often held up as an example of a movie in which tech predictions actually came true. Sure, we don’t have flying cars, hoverboards, or instantly hydrated pizzas, but we do have flat TVs, video conference calls, and smart door locks. It also might not be too late for flying cars, there are a number of companies already working on vehicles in this category.

In fact, according to Gerd Leonhard, a world-renowned futurist, who happened to write a blurb for my book, Digital Sense, says, “Humanity will change more in the next 20 years, than in the previous 300.”

Whoa.

Beyond that, there’s a host of other technologies that are maturing right now that we only dreamed about in the past. We’ve got smart AI technologies that we can talk to like Alexa, Google Now, Cortana, and Siri, cars that drive themselves, and automated smart homes that can set their own temperature and mood lighting depending on the weather.

Here’s a look at 14 companies that prove that the future we live in is absolutely fantastic.

1) Airtame

Cables, cables everywhere; it’s an unfortunate part of modern life but all of our devices need power and connections. Fortunately, there are technologies being rolled out to resolve this.
Airtame is one such solution that’s trying to tackle the problems caused by the necessity of cables for high-definition video streaming to your TV. It’s a small wireless HDMI dongle that connects to any screen or monitor for wireless casting and streaming of media. Airtame is similar to iOS Airplay.

Airtame first launched through a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo raising nearly 800 percent of their initial goal, which made it the most successful European crowdfunding campaign at the time.

2) Beyond Verbal

We are all used to the idea of talking to technology, such as giving commands to AI devices. However, our voices can do much more than simply serve as a user interface. That’s where
Beyond Verbal steps in; by focusing on voice-driven Emotions Analytics and listening to the tonality of the human voice, the company aims to revolutionize the way our health is monitored.

The company has already proven that vocal intonation can provide significant insight into the physical health of human beings; In partnership with the Mayo Clinic, Beyond Verbal recently found a significant connection between vocal biomarkers and Coronary Artery Disease. This means that medical professionals and researchers might be able to reveal health risks just by listening to our voices using Beyond Verbal’s technology, and take early action with preventative medicine.

That’s amazing! Can you hear me now?

3) Arbe Robotics

Drones are one of the technologies that people didn’t see coming. These small, flying robots are opening up all kinds of new possibilities that will change multiple industries. And if the drone light show that accompanied Lady Gaga during the Super Bowl Halftime Show powered by Intel is any indication, we are only going to see more of them.

Arbe Robotics is a startup that’s pioneering the use of automated imaging radar in the emerging market of drones. The company has built an economical and power-efficient collision avoidance technology that can view 360 degrees around the drone for up to 1250 meters. The product includes hardware and software components that help drone operators detect and avoid upcoming obstacles. This technology may also prove to be useful for automated cars.

4) Amimon

While on the subject of drones, it needs to be said that these nimble aerial devices are becoming the next big racing sport. If Drone Racing wasn’t in your vocabulary as a kid, then you’re not alone. This is one of those developments that no one expected and yet would completely amaze anyone from even five years ago.

Amimon is one company making things happen in the space. The company has built zero latency wireless HD video and uses this technology in the recently unveiled FALCORE, a sleek new racing drone designed for pilots of all experience levels. The video technology allows pilots to achieve a zero-latency pilot point of view in the drone, which is critical to effective racing. The drone can also be flown directly out of the box with its patented “Shield Mode” which automatically maintains a fixed distance above ground. This allows pilots to fly close to the ground without needing to maintain altitude manually.

It’s like pod-racing from Star Wars Episode 1, but without the bad plotline or Jar Jar Binks.

5) Humavox

As described above, cables are needed to operate many of our futuristic devices, and that sucks! Most of us have seen or sampled wireless chargers for our phones, such as charging mats or pads, that are supposed to solve this problem. But most of these solutions still don’t really allow us to detach from cables and cords entirely. Humavox, however, wants to completely restructure the wireless experience by allowing us to truly cut the cord.

Humavox uses radio-frequency (RF) wireless technology that allows us to charge wireless devices by dropping them into any compatible 3D container, such as a bowl, case, or purse regardless of placement. With this technology, we will be able to seamlessly blend chargers into our lifestyles without giving it any extra thought.

6) Inception

VR has actually been around for a long time, the one caveat being that it didn’t work very well in the past. That’s all changing, and fast. While VR has made enormous developments in recent years in the gaming industry, we have yet to see this success cross over into entertainment.

Inception, a creator of original immersive virtual reality content, is aiming to become “the Netflix of VR” by serving as a leading destination for pure VR entertainment. The platform already delivers entertainment content across different verticals such as musicals, with a VR inside tour with TimeOut London of Wicked the musical; to arts, with a virtual interactive museum exhibit of the Dali Theatre-Museum. Inception is creating VR formats that will allow you to browse through endless VR content and watch it in the same way you watch your favorite Netflix series – except up close and personal.

Take my money already!!

7) InfinityAR

Augmented Reality has been pegged as one of the top emerging technologies. In fact, Apple CEO Tim Cook has repeatedly mentioned AR as an area of interest for the company, and Microsoft has made a lot of noise about it with its HoloLens as well. One company taking a different approach is
Infinity Augmented Reality, which is developing a software-based AR engine. InfinityAR’s approach is a bit different because it relies on two simple video cameras to understand the 3D nature of the real world, and then map virtual objects on top of it.

In addition, the company is planning to partner with manufacturers to build its software AR engine into these devices. With its recently raised $15 million in funding from Chinese retail giant, Alibaba – which was Alibaba’s biggest investment to date in an Israeli company – the InfinityAR is creating a new and futuristic digital environment that will allow people to naturally interact with augmented content in their physical surroundings.

8) BreezoMeter

Big data is has been a big buzzword for awhile. But how do you make sense of big data? BreezoMeter is trying to do just that with public air. Breezometer collects, measures and analyzes public air quality information from sensors around the world and provides proprietary real-time and historical street-level data and guidance to some of the world’s largest companies. BreezoMeter was named by the White House’s Global Entrepreneurship Week as 2014’s “Most Promising Startup” worldwide. It was also named by the Journeys Conference as one of Israel’s top ten technology companies. Finally, it was named by i3 as one of the 2017 Global Cleantech 100. BreezoMeter’s customers and resellers include Dyson, GE, Cisco, Motorola Solutions, Accuweather, Eureka Forbes and others.

You smell that?

9) Lumus

Lumus provides its unique display technology to consumer electronics and smart eyewear manufacturers worldwide. To date, it’s see-through wearable displays serve multiple AR vertical markets, including healthcare, manufacturing, logistics, avionics and, more recently, consumer products.

This technology has been developed across the past 16 years, and produces see-through performance that combines a wide field of view with the most compact, natural-looking eyewear. Its investors include HTC, Shanda Group, electronics manufacturer Quanta (Macbooks) and Crystal-Optech. Its current customers include DAQRI, Thales, and Atheer among others.

10) Wombat

Wombat sees itself as the antithesis to adTech and MarTech. Looking at existing solutions in the app engagement & growth market, they noticed that there was something fundamentally broken about it: app owners had to choose between taking an easy route for themselves, but sacrificing their user experience (think of the annoying, untimely popups asking you to rate an app), or try to deliver the perfect user experience, but spend all their time or resources doing so.

Wombat’s founding team thus challenged themselves to produce the easiest experience for the app owner, while still keeping a superb mobile user experience. The result is a platform inspired by Influence Psychology. Using universal rules and machine learning, it allows the app owner to simply copy and paste one line of Wombat code into their app, and then choose from a rich bank of pre-canned and self-optimizing interactions to activate.

11) Cloudinary

Dynamic image management is a must for marketers in the digital space. The only problem is that a single image may need literally dozens of iterations to appear the way it should across every browser, device, and viewport. Creating, managing, and maintaining these images for all of your web properties can be a resource-draining problem for your IT, marketing, and graphic design teams.

Fortunately, Cloudinary allows you to manage thousands of different image versions across all of your web properties simply, easily, and affordably. The result is images that always appear the way they should on every browser and device without drawbacks such as distortion or excessive loading times. It’s especially useful if your brand utilizes image-heavy websites.

12) prooV

How do you manage and validate innovation? prooV has developed an end-to-end platform to help startups and enterprises run effective proof of concepts (PoCs). prooV handles the discovery, due diligence, testing, and deployment of successful PoCs to help startups struggling to validate their innovation, as well as investors who are seeking that validation. The company is working with hundreds of enterprises and thousands of startups across the globe to eliminate the headache of creating an effective PoC and make getting proof as painless and simple as possible.

prooV is Voorp spelled backwards… which actually makes no sense.

13) WalkMe

Walkme is a web-based service that helps users navigate the features of other web-based services. It has developed a platform to enhance user experience across various types of software. It helps its clients by creating a user experience standard that is both familiar and intuitive for the end user.
It claims that it can INSTANTLY improve their client’s user experience.

14) Moodo

We’ve been waiting for our homes to get smart for a long time. Well thanks to IoT devices like smart lights and thermostats, now they are. But those pertain to only a few of our senses. What about smell?

Enter Moodo, a customizable IoT scent mixing system recently launched on Indiegogo to complete the expanding smart home market; think Keurig, but for smells. Moodo is ditching old school home scent options such candles and plug-ins to infuse our lives with wireless, interconnected smell-good technology. Moodo offers multiple fragrance capsules that can be loaded into the device and mixed together to create a limitless number of fragrance options.

He who smelt it, dealt it!

Nope. It was Moodo!

These companies are just a glimpse into the amazing things happening in technology. And ok, ok. Not all of them are super space-agey, but they are fascinating and a testament to innovation.

The only question that remains is how quickly these technologies will become an everyday part of our lives.

Beyond Verbal Wins Frost & Sullivan’s Visionary Innovation Leadership Award Using Vocal Biomarkers to Detect Health Conditions Using Tone of Voice

TEL AVIV, Israel–(BUSINESS WIRE)– Beyond Verbal (www.beyondverbal.com), the world leader in voice-driven Emotions Analytics, has been recognized by Frost & Sullivan as the winner of the 2016 Global Voice Analytics for Disorder Diagnostics Visionary Innovation Leadership Award.

. @BeyondVerbal won the Global Voice Analytics for Disorder Diagnostics Visionary Innovation Leadership Award

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Beyond Verbal earned Frost & Sullivan’s 2016 Global Visionary award for its commitment to advancing long-standing screening, monitoring, and diagnostic problems with a unique, non-intrusive approach. Beyond Verbal has proven that vocal intonations can provide significant insights into the inner-workings of human beings, and the company recently found a significant connection between vocal biomarkers and Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) with the Mayo Clinic.

“It’s a true honor to be recognized by Frost & Sullivan, one of the global leaders in market research and analysis,” said Yuval Mor, CEO of Beyond Verbal. “Our desire is to improve healthcare by combining Emotions Analytics, AI and IoT with traditional health care methods. Creating advanced and cost effective healthcare capabilities accessible to the masses. Beyond Verbal has already embarked on a research journey to identify patterns for several diseases, which can be seen in our recent study on coronary artery disease. This honor presented to us by Frost & Sullivan is just a small testament to how impactful our research findings are to the healthcare community.”

“Frost & Sullivan recognizes Beyond Verbal’s efforts to serve the healthcare patient and provider community through its novel, voice-based analytics technology,” said Siddharth Shah, a Research Analyst with Frost & Sullivan. “Its approach of gauging patients’ health, wellness, and emotions simultaneously with an artificial intelligence-enabled technology is truly exceptional. It stands out as the first company among its peers to go beyond the mental health arena to tackle the diagnostic and monitoring challenges of physical health conditions.”

Beyond Verbal’s technology enables the understanding of emotions, well-being, and health conditions through the human voice. Founded in 2012, the award-winning company’s Emotions Analytics technology has numerous applications – from improving call center effectiveness, to quantifying emotions for market research purpose, and all the way to tracking health conditions over time – and is grounded in more than two decades of research by Chief Science Officer, Dr. Yoram Levanon.

Beyond Verbal’s technology enables the understanding of emotions, well-being, and health conditions through the human voice. Founded in 2012, the award-winning company’s Emotions Analytics technology has numerous applications – from improving call center effectiveness, to quantifying emotions for market research purpose, and all the way to tracking health conditions over time – and is grounded in more than two decades of research by Chief Science Officer, Dr. Yoram Levanon.

About Beyond Verbal:

Since its launch in 2012, Beyond Verbal has been using voice-driven emotions AI to dramatically change the way we can detect emotions and reveal health conditions. The only input needed is the human voice, making this technology non-intrusive, passive, and cost effective. Beyond Verbal’s technology has been developed based on ongoing research into the science of emotions that started in 1995. By combining the company’s patented technology with its proprietary machine learning-based algorithms and AI, Beyond Verbal is focusing on emotions understanding and discovering vocal biomarkers. During the past 22 years, the company has been able to hone its technology through multiple internal tests and independent external validations. Over time, Beyond Verbal has collected more than 3 million emotion-tagged voices in more than 40 languages, and secured their technology with multiple granted patents.

Contacts

Company Media Contact:

Jonah Balfour, +972 54-6175584(Cell)

Blonde 2.0 for Beyond Verbal

jonah@blonde20.com

10 startups pioneering the new field of emotional analytics

10 startups pioneering

Understanding how we react and make decisions is at the core of how we interact with those around us. Either in our personal lives or in business, getting know what others are feeling is more important than ever. Brands have long understood that they need more than just logic to engage customers. Coca-Cola and Pepsi rely more on emotional resonance and memorable advertising to make an impression on buyers, not so much subjective taste tests (or worse yet, fake taste tests). The same goes for virtually all marketing campaigns. But getting to know your customers is a monumental task. Now the field of emotional analytics has arrived. Its major customers might be advertisers, but applications have been made to focus on employees, healthcare and disease progression, as well as linguistic analysis.

Here are 10 of the most vital startups in the space of “emolytics” today from around the world.

  • Affectiva

    Website: Affectiva

    Founded: 2009

    Headquarters (and other locations): Waltham, Massachusetts

    Amount raised (latest round): $33.72 million ($14 million Series D, May 2016)

    Investors: WPP, National Science Foundation, Fenox Venture Capital, Horizons Ventures, Kleiner Perkins,

    Caufield & Byers (KPCB), Myrian Capital

    Founders: CEO Rana el Kaliouby, Rosalind Picard

    An MIT Media Lab spin-off, Affectiva calls itself the pioneer in Emotion AI. They use computer vision and a massive emotions database with 4 million separate facial expressions to track and summarize expressed emotions. The database includes samples from 75 countries, helping account for possible differences across cultures.

    “We envision a future where our mobile and IoT devices can read and adapt to human emotions, transforming not only how we interact with hyper-intelligent technology, but also how we communicate with each other in a digital world,” Rana el Kaliouby said last year after their last fundraising round. “We build artificial emotional intelligence that senses, models and adapts to human emotion and behavior. It is a big, exciting vision for artificial intelligence, as it realizes the practical business application of AI and fuels innovation in many global markets.”

  • Beyond Verbal

    Website: Beyond Verbal

    Founded: 2012

    Headquarters (and other locations): Tel Aviv, Israel

    Amount raised (latest round): $10 million ($3 million, September 2016)

    Investors: Kuang-Chi Science, Singulariteam, Omninet Capital, Winnovation

    Founders: SVP BizDev Yoav Hoshen, Yuval Mor

    Beyond Verbal claims to be one of the only companies in the world giving literal emotional feedback in terms of analytics, but unlike other members of this list they aren’t reliant on facial recognition. They track voice patterns, keeping track of lonely family members and finding ways to apply the technology to the dating world by matching people according to attitudes and moods. They have pivoted from focusing on marketing to healthcare, pioneering a study with the Mayo Clinic to link voice patterns to progressive heart disease.

    They have demonstrated their emolytic capabilities by analyzing Donald Trump during last year’s Republican primary debates and his combative exchanges with people such as former Fox News host Megyn Kelly.

    This company, perhaps more than others, is producing technology that might have a massive impact on the way voice assistants and spoken translation technologies work in the future, choosing to respond to statements or questions with specific tones or translations that reflect the nuance of a bad (or good) mood.

  • Lightwave

    Website: Lightwave, @_lightwave

    Founded: 2012

    Headquarters (and other locations): Venice, California

    Amount raised (latest round): Unknown

    Founders: CEO Rana June

    With major clients like Google, 20th Century Fox, Unilever, Pepsi, and Jaguar, Lightwave is employing the go-big-or-go-home strategy to try to dominate the conversation on emolytics. They have been found analyzing not just audiences behind the TV screen but also crowds at large sporting events such as the NCAA basketball championship between UNC and Villanova. That’s 72,000 people during a single game by reading facial responses every 10th of a second. They have also used their technology to, similar to Beyond Verbal, take a hard look at the 2016 election with emotional reactions to speeches by Hillary Clinton.

    “Any business that has a customer is going to be affected by the ability to measure the emotional reaction of the customer,” Founder and CEO Rana June told Inc in 2016, predicting these changes would be seen across the board “very, very soon. I want to say ‘today.’”

  • BehaviorMatrix

    Website: BehaviorMatrix, @BehaviorMatrix

    Founded: 2008

    Headquarters (and other locations): Blue Bell, Pennsylvania

    Amount raised (latest round): $1.7 million debt financing

    Founders: Chairman & CEO Bill Thompson

    BehaviorMatrix measures and interprets emotions, behaviors and influence around global communications. They describe their approach as helping companies understand people with deeper insights that “allow them to act to affect positive change.” They have real-time emotion-measuring tools for customers and larger versions to track influencers in a given industry or among a given demographic. Similar to Beyond Verbal, they have applied their technology to healthcare with a study of emotional expression in diabetes information forums online.

    “BehaviorMatrix illuminates the ‘micro data’ within data streams to reveal the real insights, and we aim to dramatically disrupt the business intelligence and Data Science worlds,” Thompson wrote after the company debuted the SMARTview360 to take real-time measurements of 48 separate emotions on various media, including social.

    “Traditional measurements of likes or dislikes, positives or negatives can be shots in the dark that provide marginal results,” wrote CPO Keith Harry in 2015. “This ability to understand the context of data is powered by our Natural Language Processing Engine that operates like the human brain when processing language.”

    “Actually understanding hearts and minds allows us to help our customers not only interpret, but also effectively predict future behavior.”

  • nViso

    Website: nViso

    Founded: 2005

    Headquarters (and other locations): Lausanne, Switzerland

    Founders: CEO Tim Llewellynn

    nViso boasts what it calls “the most scalable, robust, and accurate artificial intelligence solutions” for instant emotional analysis of consumers on the market, focusing their business on major brands and advertising. They say they have original 3D facial imaging technology that works with “ordinary webcams” to gauge consumers’ responses online.

  • Kanjoya

    Website: Kanjoya

    Founded: 2006

    Headquarters (and other locations): San Francisco, California

    Amount raised (latest round):

    Kanjoya Investors: Acquired by Ultimate Software; Allegro Venture Partners, Ulu Ventures, SV Angel, Ronald Conway,

    FLOODGATE, D.E. Shaw & Co., Constantin Partners

    Founders: Kanjoya CEO Armen Berjikly

    Kanjoya is different than other entries here for the simple reason that they focus on your company’s workforce, not its customers. Employee satisfaction of late has been recognized as equally important to growing businesses as customer service, understanding that happy employees tend to produce better work

    They were acquired by Ultimate Software in September 2016, simultaneously launching UltiPro Perception to measure employee experience within companies.

    “Effective workforce decisions require a delicate balance of employee emotions and motivations, layered with business metrics,” their website reads, describing the program. “With our machine learning-based models, you can make those decisions with comprehensive insights and predictive power.”

  • Realeyes

    Website: Realeyes

    Founded: 2007

    Headquarters (and other locations): London, England

    Amount raised (latest round): $9.2 million ($2.5 million debt financing, 2015)

    Investors: Entrepreneurs Fund (EF), SmartCap AS, European Commission, European Regional Development Fund

    Founders: Kanjoya CEO Armen Berjikly

    Founders: Martin Salo, Elnar Hajiyev, CEO Mihkel Jäätma

    Realeyes gets people to share access to their personal webcams, from which they can use their own computer vision algorithms and machine learning to track expressions during broadcasts, advertisements, and other media. Taking this visual feedback, they can help content creators to learn from their mistakes and put together videos that audiences will want to engage with. They offer 24-hour report turnarounds for $3,500, according to their website. It works by dragging and dropping a given video into the Realeyes dashboard and defining audience segments and can analyze up to 300 people at a time.

    Realeyes from Realeyes on Vimeo.

  • iMotions

    Website: iMotions, @iMotionsGlobal

    Founded: 2005

    Headquarters (and other locations): Copenhagen, Denmark (Boston, Massachusetts)

    Amount raised (latest round): $4.3 million ($2.7 million, 2007)

    Investors: Inventure Capital, Syddansk Venture, The Way Forward Aps

    Founders: CEO Peter Hartzbech

    The company focuses on supporting research teams at universities and within larger companies, saying their software supports more than 50 market-available biosensors and eye sensors that will help collect data and produce observations with their machine learning technology. Nielsen, Deloitte, P&G, and Harvard University are listed as customers on the company website. Their team has also worked with Stanford to track eye movements by drivers in what they say is one of the most advanced driving simulators in the world.

    They also announced a partnership back in 2015 with previous list entry Affectiva to better integrate emotional analytics with biometric research with iMotions Founder & CEO Peter Hartzbech saying at the time, “Measuring unfiltered and unbiased emotional responses is key to understanding human behavior in consumer engagement and user experience.”

  • CrowdEmotion

    Website: CrowdEmotion, @CrowdEmotion

    Headquarters (and other locations): London, England

    Amount raised (latest round): Unknown

    Founders: CEO Matthew Celuszak, Daniel Jabry, CTO Diego Caravana

    CrowdEmotion is a British company whose platform for facial expression provides insights on emotional expression. Their other platform, MeMo, can be used for two-way video chat and self-analysis to better help with personal engagement tactics in business or for your own personal growth. They have been working with the BBC for the last three years to measure TV audience engagement.

    CEO Matthew Celuszak expressed confidence in his technology’s ability to affect the way that media engages with its audiences when they announced that partnership in 2014.

    “With today’s media noisier than ever, we’re here to innovate, bring emotions to life and reshape broadcast media through our findings.”

  • Kairos

    Website: Kairos

    Headquarters (and other locations): Miami, Florida

    Amount raised (latest round): $4.26 million ($300,000, 2015)

    Investors: Christopher Alden, Eniac Ventures, Florida Angel Nexus, Jeremiah Tolbert, Kapor Capital, Marcelo Ballona,

    Neil Shah, NewMe Accelerator, New World Angels, Peter Livingston, True Ventures, University Of Central Florida,

    venVelo

    Founders: CEO Brian Brackeen

    Kairos defines itself as an AI company. Like many of the companies on this list, they focus largely on facial recognition and use computer vision to process slight differences in facial expressions that will tell viewers what precise emotions someone is experiencing at any given time. Kairos claims that 4,600 developers use their software. Their founder is not one to hide that he thinks his company’s technology will be the foundation of tomorrow’s machines, which should be able to better get a grip on what their human counterparts are feeling when they communicate.

    “Machines need to be a lot more empathetic,” Brackeen said in 2015 after buying out New York facial recognition company IMRSV. “They need to better understand who we are so they can serve us.”

    Kairos engineer talks about the company [courtesy]

    Kairos engineer talks about the company [courtesy]

Talking to a Computer May Soon Be Enough to Diagnose Illness

CES 2017 intro slide

In recent years, technology has been producing more and more novel ways to diagnose and treat illness. Urine tests will soon be able to detect cancer. Smartphone apps can diagnose STIs. Chatbots can provide quality mental healthcare.

Joining this list is a minimally-invasive technique that’s been getting increasing buzz across various sectors of healthcare: disease detection by voice analysis.

It’s basically what it sounds like: you talk, and a computer analyzes your voice and screens for illness. Most of the indicators that machine learning algorithms can pick up aren’t detectable to the human ear.

When we do hear irregularities in our own voices or those of others, the fact we’re noticing them at all means they’re extreme; elongating syllables, slurring, trembling, or using a tone that’s unusually flat or nasal could all be indicators of different health conditions. Even if we can hear them, though, unless someone says, “I’m having chest pain” or “I’m depressed,” we don’t know how to analyze or interpret these biomarkers.

Computers soon will, though.

Researchers from various medical centers, universities, and healthcare companies have collected voice recordings from hundreds of patients and fed them to machine learning software that compares the voices to those of healthy people, with the aim of establishing patterns clear enough to pinpoint vocal disease indicators.

In one particularly encouraging study, doctors from the Mayo Clinic worked with Israeli company Beyond Verbal to analyze voice recordings from 120 people who were scheduled for a coronary angiography. Participants used an app on their phones to record 30-second intervals of themselves reading a piece of text, describing a positive experience, then describing a negative experience. Doctors also took recordings from a control group of 25 patients who were either healthy or getting non-heart-related tests.

The doctors found 13 different voice characteristics associated with coronary artery disease. Most notably, the biggest differences between heart patients and non-heart patients’ voices occurred when they talked about a negative experience.

Heart disease isn’t the only illness that shows promise for voice diagnosis. Researchers are also making headway in the conditions below.

  • ADHD: German company Audioprofiling is using voice analysis to diagnose ADHD in children, achieving greater than 90 percent accuracy in identifying previously diagnosed kids based on their speech alone. The company’s founder gave speech rhythm as an example indicator for ADHD, saying children with the condition speak in syllables less equal in length.
  • PTSD: With the goal of decreasing the suicide rate among military service members, Boston-based Cogito partnered with the Department of Veterans Affairs to use a voice analysis app to monitor service members’ moods. Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital are also using the app as part of a two-year study to track the health of 1,000 patients with bipolar disorder and depression.
  • Brain injury: In June 2016, the US Army partnered with MIT’s Lincoln Lab to develop an algorithm that uses voice to diagnose mild traumatic brain injury. Brain injury biomarkers may include elongated syllables and vowel sounds or difficulty pronouncing phrases that require complex facial muscle movements.
  • Parkinson’s: Parkinson’s disease has no biomarkers and can only be diagnosed via a costly in-clinic analysis with a neurologist. The Parkinson’s Voice Initiative is changing that by analyzing 30-second voice recordings with machine learning software, achieving 98.6 percent accuracy in detecting whether or not a participant suffers from the disease.

Challenges remain before vocal disease diagnosis becomes truly viable and widespread. For starters, there are privacy concerns over the personal health data identifiable in voice samples. It’s also not yet clear how well algorithms developed for English-speakers will perform with other languages.

Despite these hurdles, our voices appear to be on their way to becoming key players in our health.

http://www.cio.com/article/3159592/consumer-electronics/10-best-gadgets-from-ces-2017.html

Event 11

Join our research efforts into the voice.
Revealing vocal biomarkers that could potentially
detect various health conditions and improve
remote patient care

February 19th – 23rd, 2017

Orlando, Florida Innovation Zone Booth 7785


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for more info


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Event 13

March 06th – 09th 2017 Tel Aviv Israel

Stand D 17

Discover how vocal biomarkers and Emotions monitoring
can ultimately improve Remote patient care


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Event 12

Meet us at

BrainTech 2017

March 06th & 07th, 2017
Tel Aviv, Israel


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Emotions Research Leader

Beyond Verbal Communication, the world leader in voice-driven Emotion Analytics nominated by Gartner as a Cool Vendor for Human-Machine Interface for 2014 and the recipient of a Frost & Sullivan Visionary Innovation Leadership Award in the Voice Analytics for Health Disorder Monitoring and Diagnostics for 2016, is looking for an Emotions Research Leader to join our team in Tel-Aviv.

Job description:

1. This role includes overseeing all the company activities of the emotion related research, product definition and development as well as validation:

– Defining and researching various voice-based viable emotional features which can be used for commercialization

– Documenting and describing the existing emotional features and our key findings

– Managing validation processes both internally and with external research institutes

– Defining the psychological meaning of the emotions and how that can be adapted to commercial use

– Define the inter-relations between company’s health-related and emotions-related activities

– Ability to communicate with research partners and customers

– Ability to be a spokes-person and present the company at professional events and expo’s

– Stay up to date in regard to the research and technology related to voice and emotions

2. Leading and coordinating the interactions between all the groups involved in the development of the product.

3. Building strategies and bringing ideas to improve the development process.

 

Recruitments:

PhD and up in Psychology or doctoral student with at least 2 years’ experience conducting research in emotions research field).

Experience in conducting and managing research projects

2+ years of experience in related industries

Experience in leading the process of defining and developing new products

Fluent in English

Research oriented

High Writing and oral skills including academic writing

People oriented and entrepreneurial character